Tag Archives: post-dispatch

Provost Weixlmann on Administrative Leave

If you’ve been following the Avis Meyer story (and this blog) for the last couple years, you’ve heard a great deal from the Saint Louis University provost, Joseph Weixlmann – including his email responses to several alumni.

If you’ve been following the St. Louis Post-Dispatch or the press releases coming out of SLU this week, you already know that Provost Weixlmann has stepped down from his position to take a two month administrative leave.

Much like the Post-Dispatch journalists, we’re wondering what lead to his resignation and what’s coming next for both Weixlmann and the university.

For more info, read:

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Riverfront Times posts about Movie Trivia Night

Chad Garrison of the St. Louis RFT posted about the upcoming Avis Meyer Movie Trivia night. Visit the RFT site to read the article in its entirety. Please note that the date of the event is Sunday, May 3 (it is misprinted in the article).

Fundraiser Planned for Embattled SLU Journalism Mentor, Avis Meyer

meyeravis.jpg
slu.edu
Avis Meyer

A legal battle with his employer, Saint Louis University, has left Avis Meyer with legal bills “approaching the six-figure” mark.

As you may recall, the university sued Meyer back in 2007 after the longtime journalism adviser established a non-profit entity with the exact same name as the student paper, The University News.

At the time, SLU officials were proposing a charter change for the paper and Meyer claimed he was concerned that the administration planned to wrest control of the publication from the students. The non-profit would allow the students to continue the paper off-campus should they not agree to the new charter.

In the end, the students voted in favor of the charter and Meyer dissolved the non-profit. It could have ended there.
Instead the university filed suit against Meyer to ensure that he would never use the paper’s name in the future. The lawsuit was settled last month. A federal judge dismissed six of the seven charges against Meyer. (Meyer is also banned from the newsroom, though he continues to teach communications courses at the university and the newspaper’s staff considers him its faculty mentor.)

The seventh charge in the lawsuit, alleging that Meyer destroyed e-mail evidence, was settled. It requires that he teach one summer course for free at the school. If Meyer cannot — for whatever reason — teach the course, his wife must pay the university $6,000.

“I was amazed that they asked my wife, a fourth grade school teacher at a Catholic school, to sign a document saying if something happens to me she owes Saint Louis U. six grand,” Meyer told the student paper last month.

When I spoke to him yesterday, Meyer did not want to talk about the lawsuit so much as he did the fundraiser planned for him on May 2. Friends and former students are putting on the event — a movie trivia night at the Richmond Heights Community Center.

“It’s incredibly humbling that all these people are wanting to help,” says Meyer, who crafted all 100 questions for the competition. “From what I’m told the event is already half full. I know my wife is planning to bake lemon bars for sale for three days prior to to the event.”

Post-Dispatch columnist and film critic, Joe Holleman, is emceeing the trivia. For more information and tickets, visit the Friends of Avis Meyer Legal Defense Fund.

Avis Meyer Movie Trivia Night on May 3rd

The 18-month-long lawsuit that Saint Louis University waged against Avis Meyer is now over. And even though the attorney charged Avis a highly-discounted rate, he’s still incurred quite a legal bill.

The friends of Avis Meyer have organized a fundraiser on May 3. Please show your support by spreading the word, coming to the event and contributing to the cause.

When:
Sunday, May 3
Doors open at 6 p.m.

Why:
To help our friend pay legal expenses

Where:
Richmond Heights Community Center
8001 Dale Ave.
Richmond Heights, MO 63117
Map and Directions

What:
Movie Trivia Night
Avis has created 100 questions, 10 each for 10 movie genres, to challenge even the most avid moviegoers. Joe Holleman, columnist and movie critic of the Post-Dispatch will host the event, which will begin at 6:30 p.m.

Awards:
Avis is donating books about movies. The first-place table’s winners will choose their books first; then the second-place table; then the third. In addition, three lucky players will receive a $50 gift certificate to Pietro’s, Spiro’s or Dressel’s.

Cost:
The minimum cost per ticket is $25**. Anything beyond that would be welcomed, but not expected — especially if you’re in education or journalism. The room seats 288 well-wishers.

BYOE:
Please bring your own snacks and soft drinks. Alcohol is not permitted at this event. Baked goods, some created by Anna Marie, herself, will be available for purchase.

RSVP:
Please RSVP by May 1 by adding your name and number attending to the responses on this site. The “Responses” link can be found at the top of the page under the “Movie Trivia Night” header.

Note:
If you cannot attend the Movie Trivia Night but would like to donate to Avis’ defense fund, you may send checks** made  payable to Anna Marie Meyer, to:
10828 Woodforest Drive
St. Louis, MO 63128

Note (another):
If you cannot attend the trivia bowl, some alumni are planning a second event — a picnic in an area park, tentatively scheduled for May 24, a Sunday afternoon. This website will carry details, as they become available; and Avis and Anna Marie should appear at both events.

**This is not a tax-deductible donation.

RSVP by leaving a comment on http://friendsofavismeyer.wordpress.com/

Letter to the Editor: SLU’s Vendetta against professor is shameful

Julian Long’s Letter to the Editor was published on STLToday on March 5. We agree with many of  Long’s points, including that all the dirty details of the case have not been outted by the Post-Dispatch. We’re sure details will come to light as time goes on, but for now, Long’s claim that SLU required Mrs. Meyer sign an agreement that she would owe the University $6,000 if Dr. Meyer passed away before the end of June 2009 is true. Our advice to Avis? Wear a bullet proof vest and look both ways before crossing Grand.

Read Long’s letter on STLToday.com

03.05.2009 5:10 pm

SLU’s vendetta against professor is shameful

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

I was present in the courtroom last Monday at the close of Saint Louis University’s lawsuit against Professor Avis Meyer. Having watched your reporter speak with SLU administrators I am not surprised that your story entitled “SLU and professor settle lawsuit” seems to consist almost entirely of university spin, though apparently Post-Dispatch representatives contacted Professor Meyer before the story ran.

Your story’s lead states that Professor Meyer has agreed “to pay the university $6000 plus certain legal fees” and “refrain from illegally using the university’s name.” Then the next five paragraphs give what appears to be the university’s version of the history of the lawsuit and imply that the university won its case. That simply isn’t true. The university “won” only one point, a claim that Professor Meyer had deleted certain email messages.

SLU lost this lawsuit on the merits, and not with any grace or dignity. In a final sorry gesture, SLU administrators demanded that Mrs. Meyer—yes, Mrs. Meyer—sign an affidavit agreeing to pay the university in case of Professor Meyer’s untimely death. The real story of the SLU vendetta against Avis Meyer is equally sorry. It shames Saint Louis University, and it shames the Society of Jesus. It’s too bad the Post-Dispatch won’t report it.

Julian Long

St. Louis

Post-Dispatch: SLU and professor settle lawsuit

Click here to read this story on STLToday.com.

SLU and professor settle lawsuit
Avis Meyer

Avis Meyer
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

St. Louis University communications professor Avis Meyer has agreed to pay the university $6,000 plus certain legal fees and to refrain from illegally using the university’s name, in a settlement approved by a federal judge Tuesday.

This resolves the final count remaining in a copyright infringement lawsuit SLU brought against Meyer in October 2007. In December, Judge Carol Jackson had thrown out six other counts in SLU’s case because she said the school hadn’t shown that Meyer had used the university’s name for commercial gain.

The dispute arose after Meyer filed paperwork with the Missouri secretary of state’s office to create a nonprofit organization with the same name as the student newspaper. Meyer, who has been the newspaper’s official and unofficial adviser, said he did so in case students wanted to take the newspaper off campus.

Students had been fighting with administrators in the spring of 2007 over proposed changes to the newspaper’s charter. But in the end, the students decided to stay on campus. So Meyer dissolved the corporation.

Jeff Fowler, a SLU spokesman, said Tuesday: “We feel like this is a victory for the university. ”

But Meyer offered a different take on the outcome.

“I think losing one out of seven might be considered a victory for us,” he said, referring to himself and the newspaper staff.

When the federal trial began on Monday, Jackson ordered Meyer to pay SLU’s legal fees related to their complaints over his destruction of certain e-mails. Jackson said she didn’t believe Meyer was trying to thwart SLU’s case, but she said his actions were “thoughtless and reckless.”

SLU believes that if those e-mails had not been destroyed, then the first six counts would have been upheld, Fowler said. He said SLU has not yet decided whether it will appeal the dismissal of the other six counts.

Both parties finally decided to sit down to find an agreement after a bewildered Jackson asked them on Monday why they’re not able to find a resolution to the last issue. She said she understood there is a lot of distrust between both sides.

“But there’s really not a whole lot here,” she said. “I’m sorry, I just don’t know why we’re here.”

The court recessed as both sides then hashed out an agreement.

SLU has said all along that it was not treating Meyer any differently than it would anyone else who tried to unlawfully use the university’s name.

But Meyer and his supporters have suggested otherwise. In his opening statement, Brian Gill, Meyer’s attorney, said that the way that SLU has pursued this case “would impress even one of Victor Hugo’s inspectors.”

Meyer is a former part-time copy editor for the Post-Dispatch.

kkumar@post-dispatch.com | 314-340-8017


Update on today’s settlement

I received more information today about the SLU v. Meyer case this evening. The judge has two days to accept the terms of the settlement. Among the settlement terms there is a chance of a misdemeanor along with reimbursement of a small portion of SLU’s legal fees. These concessions would be made in return for continued tenure and a clean slate.

Given the matters of the last two years, what a relief to see the case coming to a close. Thank you again to all of the alumni, journalists and community members for your support.

Please check back soon for more information on the judge’s final decision.

SLU v. Avis Meyer Case Settled

As of 4:15pm, both sides have settled in the SLU v. Avis Meyer case.

The details of the settlement have not yet been released.  SLU will be reimbursed for a portion of attorney’s fees, but the final amount has not been disclosed.  According to an audience member in court, the judge will “sign off” on the settled issues tomorrow morning.

This means that the legal battle is over and Dr. Avis Meyer was not found guilty of any of the seven charges set forth by Saint Louis University. (Update at 10pm on 3/2/09: https://saveavis.wordpress.com/2009/03/03/update-on-todays-settlement/)